Centuries of Ottoman rule may have left the Bosnians in an identity crisis, but one thing’s for certain – you can never call their coffee Turkish.

 

 

Bosnian coffee is a part of the Bosnian and Herzegovinian identity. It is the symbol of the country and a part of its tradition, but also a reflection of gourmet mentality of its citizens.

Bosnia and Herzegovina has a long tradition of coffee drinking, which came in our country with the Ottoman influences from the Orient. Therefore it is right to say that coffee is one of the Bosnian national beverages.

 

 

Bosnian vs. Turkish Coffee

Preparation of the traditional Bosnian coffee begins with the roasting of raw coffee. Baked coffee beans are then ground in a manual coffee grinder. Only then in a gently heated metal pot which in Bosnia is called džezva finely grinded coffee is put to which is added boiled water.

Turkish coffee is made by adding the coffee and sugar to water, heat it until you see bubbles and serve into a small cup with a saucer. But, here is how making Bosnian coffee becomes art. Bosnian coffee starts by only heating the water in a džezva on the stove. After coming to a boil, a small amount of water is set aside in a ceramic cup. The coffee is then added to the džezva and put back on the gas stove for a few seconds, allowing the liquid to boil yet again and create a thick foam.

The bottom of džezva must be wider and the džezva should taper towards the top. Wait a couple of minutes until the coffee dregs settle and pour the coffee into fildžan (a small cup) and serve with rahat lokum and a glass of cold water.

 

Given that Bosnian coffee has been the backbone of social life in Bosnia and Herzegovina for centuries, it has evolved over time and acquired different names depending on the occasion when it is drunk.

The first coffee of the morning, which is made strong enough to refresh you and wake you up, is called razgalica. At some point later in the morning, or before the afternoon coffee, there is razgovoruša, which is drunk to encourage socializing and conversation. Šutkuša is drunk in the peace and quiet of the early evening. Dočekuša is drunk when entertaining guests and sikteruša is given as a subtle hint that it’s time to wrap up the socializing and that the guests should take their leave!

 

 

Have any of you been inspired to try this Bosnian coffee?

Let us know in the comments below if you would like to try this hot beverage in Sarajevo.

 

 

 

Bosnia and Herzegovina is one of Europe’s most visually stunning places worth visiting. Located in the western Balkans, bordering Croatia to the north, Serbia to the east, and Montenegro to the southeast. Bosnia is a remarkable place where the East meets the West.

It has rugged beautiful terrain, a unique mix of cultures and faiths and kind and welcoming people. Also, it has numerous medieval castle ruins, impressive waterfalls, bargain value skiing, and some of the most captivating sightseeing in southeastern Europe.

A visit to Bosnia offers an opportunity to sample the cultures of three major faiths all come together in this small area.

You will hear the Muslim call to prayer over the minarets, inhale incense in a mystical feeling Serbian Orthodox church, and hear the subtle clicking of rosary bead in a Roman Catholic church, all in the same day.

The county has become popular in recent years thanks to the increasing tourism and cheaper prices.

1# Sarajevo, the current capital city of Bosnia

2# The country is nicknamed the “Heart Shaped Land” due to the country’s slight heart shape.

 

3# The name “Bosnia” comes from an Indo-European word Bosana, which means water.

4# Bosnia and Herzegovina consist of two Entities – the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Republic Srpska.

5# The currency is Bosnian Convertible Mark, currency code is BAM and the symbol is KM.

6# Sarajevo hosted the 1984 Winter Olympics.

7# Sarajevo Film Festival has become the largest and most famous film festival in the Balkans and South-East Europe.

8# Bosnian coffee has been the backbone of social life in Bosnia and Herzegovina for centuries.

9# Trams were first regularly used in Europe in Sarajevo, starting in 1885.

10# There are three official languages which are all really the same.

 

11# It has the last remaining jungle in Europe at Perućica.

 

12# Bosnia and Herzegovina have a Pyramid.

 

13# 3.5 million people live in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

14# The life expectancy in Bosnia is 75 years.

Hope you enjoyed our little lession about Bosnia and Herzegovina!

Let’s hear your comments!