The Art of Bosnian coffee

Centuries of Ottoman rule may have left the Bosnians in an identity crisis, but one thing’s for certain – you can never call their coffee Turkish.

 

 

Bosnian coffee is a part of the Bosnian and Herzegovinian identity. It is the symbol of the country and a part of its tradition, but also a reflection of gourmet mentality of its citizens.

Bosnia and Herzegovina has a long tradition of coffee drinking, which came in our country with the Ottoman influences from the Orient. Therefore it is right to say that coffee is one of the Bosnian national beverages.

 

 

Bosnian vs. Turkish Coffee

Preparation of the traditional Bosnian coffee begins with the roasting of raw coffee. Baked coffee beans are then ground in a manual coffee grinder. Only then in a gently heated metal pot which in Bosnia is called džezva finely grinded coffee is put to which is added boiled water.

Turkish coffee is made by adding the coffee and sugar to water, heat it until you see bubbles and serve into a small cup with a saucer. But, here is how making Bosnian coffee becomes art. Bosnian coffee starts by only heating the water in a džezva on the stove. After coming to a boil, a small amount of water is set aside in a ceramic cup. The coffee is then added to the džezva and put back on the gas stove for a few seconds, allowing the liquid to boil yet again and create a thick foam.

The bottom of džezva must be wider and the džezva should taper towards the top. Wait a couple of minutes until the coffee dregs settle and pour the coffee into fildžan (a small cup) and serve with rahat lokum and a glass of cold water.

 

Given that Bosnian coffee has been the backbone of social life in Bosnia and Herzegovina for centuries, it has evolved over time and acquired different names depending on the occasion when it is drunk.

The first coffee of the morning, which is made strong enough to refresh you and wake you up, is called razgalica. At some point later in the morning, or before the afternoon coffee, there is razgovoruša, which is drunk to encourage socializing and conversation. Šutkuša is drunk in the peace and quiet of the early evening. Dočekuša is drunk when entertaining guests and sikteruša is given as a subtle hint that it’s time to wrap up the socializing and that the guests should take their leave!

 

 

Have any of you been inspired to try this Bosnian coffee?

Let us know in the comments below if you would like to try this hot beverage in Sarajevo.

 

 

 

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